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The White Sox and MLB are just under seven weeks away from the Aug. 1 trade deadline.

And the South Siders aren’t exactly performing up to par this season. They hold a 29-39 record, as of this writing, with a third-place standing in AL Central — far and away the weakest division in baseball. If the Sox continue their ways as the deadline nears, one MLB analyst sees a perfect fit for Tim Anderson if the Sox pivot to sellers.

“The Dodgers seem like the hand-in-glove fit,” Russell Dorsey said on 670 The Score with Bernstein & Holmes. “Big-time market. Big-time team. Bright lights that seem to fit what Tim Anderson’s brand is. The guy, as the years have gone on, has really enjoyed the moment.”

The Dodgers have Miguel Rojas holding down baseball’s sixth position. Rojas, 34, isn’t performing all that well this season either. He’s slashing .209/.239/.246 from the plate. He’s an excellent defender, but a poor creator on offense.

They lost shortstop Gavin Lux to the 60-day injured list with a torn ACL he suffered during the preseason. That left the Dodgers with a major gap in their lineup. But Anderson could be the straw that stirs the drink in Los Angeles.

“It’s a team that’s always made sense for Tim Anderson if the White Sox weren’t going to be in the AL Central race or in the wild card race,” Dorsey said. “If you look around the league for teams that need a shortstop, after they lost Gavin Lux, hand-in-glove fit.”

Tuesday, on The Pivot Podcast, Anderson offered his thoughts on the club option the White Sox have in place for him next season.

“I understand the business,” Anderson said. “If they want to keep me, then cool. And if they don’t, then cool either way.

“My time is coming. I’m going to be patient and just continue to keep working. Whatever is for me is going to come to me anyway.”

MORE: Tim Anderson gives opinion on future with the White Sox

It’s no surprise Anderson isn’t emphatic about remaining on the South Side. They’ve failed to put the pieces together with the core the front office started to puzzle together in 2016.

Since Anderson’s arrival in the majors, the White Sox have made the playoffs twice, never making it past the division series round. During the same span, they’ve had a winning record twice, including the shortened 2020 season.

Anderson has done his part, too. He’s recorded four straight seasons batting over .300; he won the batting title in 2019, too. His defense isn’t optimal, but he recently flexed to second base during the World Baseball Classic, showing his versatility and team-driven mentality.

The Dodgers would give Anderson an ideal route for performing in the playoffs. They’ve made the playoffs in every season for the last 10 years. Let that sink in for a second.

Hypothetically, if the White Sox dealt Anderson to the Dodgers at the deadline, he’d also have a perfect opportunity to cash in on the shortstop checks he missed out on last offseason. The Dodgers would undoubtedly pick up his club option for next season. But after that? Here comes the money, if he performs up to Dodger standard.

As for the White Sox, most expect the club to wave the white flag at the trade deadline if they can’t capitalize on the roster at hand. The core hasn’t worked, even when they’re healthy. It’s hard to use the division’s historical underperformance this season as a way to see this team as a playoff club, too.

On the bright side, Anderson would certainly cultivate a sweet package in return for the Sox. According to Bleacher Report, the Dodgers have the second-best farm system in baseball, as of May. The Sox could get a head start on rebuilding their minor league affiliates if they choose to steer the ship in that direction.

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