Livescore Sunday, May 19
Newsletter
[gtranslate]

Former President Donald Trump is on trial in New York City, where he is facing felony charges related to a 2016 hush money payment to adult film actress Stormy Daniels. It marks the first time in history that a former U.S. president has been tried on criminal charges.

MORE: Donald Trump is on trial in New York. Here’s what to know about the historic case

Trump last April pleaded not guilty to a 34-count indictment charging him with falsifying business records in connection with a hush money payment his then-attorney Michael Cohen made to Daniels in order to boost his electoral prospects in the 2016 presidential election.

MORE: Who is Juan Merchan, the judge overseeing Trump’s New York criminal trial?

Jury selection could take up to two weeks, with the entire trial expected to last between six and eight weeks.

Latest Developments

Apr 16, 12:09 PM

Lawyer asks for ‘honest answers’ as individual questioning begins

Jury selection is moving into a new phase with lawyers beginning the individual questioning of prospective jurors who made it through Judge Merchan’s initial cuts.

Assistant District Attorney Joshua Steinglass, up first, reminded prospective jurors that the case is not a referendum on their politics.

“Really give us the most honest answers you can,” Steinglass said. “No one is suggesting you can’t be a fair juror because you’ve heard of Donald Trump.” He added, “We don’t expect you to have been living under a rock for the last eight years or the last 30 years.”

Steinglass first asked whether anyone felt like the district attorney’s office had to prove more than the law requires “because of who he is.”

Not a single hand went up.

“I think the job of the jury is to understand what’s facts,” one woman said. “I don’t think it matters what my political views are. We listen to the facts of the case.”

Trump is engaged with some of the responses at times, and at other times he leans back in his chair with his eyelids heavy.

Apr 16, 11:56 AM

Excused juror says jury pool’s attitudes seem ‘pretty even’

A prospective juror who went through questioning but was ultimately excused from the case told ABC News outside the courthouse that she didn’t like the former president, but that it was important he get a fair trial.

“I don’t like him, I don’t approve of what he did as president,” said Kara McGee, when asked by ABC News about her feelings on Trump. “But the right to a fair trial is extremely important. And if this would serve to uphold that, then that would be my priority.”

McGee was excused from the case because of scheduling conflicts with her job.

“No matter what you think about someone as a person, or what other things they may have done, what he is on trial for is a very specific thing that even he deserves the right to a fair trial,” she said.

Asked about the sentiment of the other prospective jurors on their opinions of Trump, McGee said it “seemed pretty even, surprisingly.”

“I thought because this is Manhattan it might be a little bit more liberal, but there were a number of people who said ‘Yes, I listen to Fox, I watch Fox, I have been on Trump mailing lists in the past,'” she said. “So not really leaning towards one side or the other, that I can tell.”

“You got a sense that people were really trying to put anything that they had brought to this aside, and step in and do their civic duty,” she said. “And that people really were being honest.”

Apr 16, 11:47 AM

Prospective juror who read ‘Art of the Deal’ gets a smile from Trump

Several more prospective jurors have moved on to the next round of the screening process after some were excused after saying they could not serve impartially.

Among those who remain following the initial questionnaire are a senior living professional from the Upper West Side, a native Mexican who became a U.S. citizen in 2017, a corporate lawyer who lives in Chelsea, and a Disney employee.

A twice-married man who lives in Battery Park earned a tight smile from former President Trump when he said he had read some of his books, including “The Art of the Deal.” He said he read that book, as well as “How to be Rich” and a third title that he couldn’t quite remember, prompting a chuckle from Trump.

He said that relatives on his wife’s side lobby and fundraise for the Republican Party, and that he followed Trump on Twitter during his presidency.

“I don’t think there’s anything that would prevent me from being a fair and impartial juror,” the man said. “I feel that no one is above the law.”

He said, however, that he “would be lying” if he said he would promise not to discuss the case “to some degree” with his wife. When the judge said he could say nothing of substance, the man replied, “That would be tough.”

The man also said his daughter was the victim of a violent sexual assault that he described as “traumatic,” but he said it left him with a “generally favorable view of the legal system.”

Trump has largely remained engaged during the process, reviewing what appears to be a copy of the jury questionnaire and keeping watch over the prospective jurors as they tick through their answers.

But at times, like on Monday, he has been observed shutting his eyes, allowing his chin to slouch, then quickly jerking it back up.

Apr 16, 10:27 AM

Questioning of prospective jurors resumes

A prospective juror who was feeling under the weather was excused before jury selection resumed this morning.

The proceedings resumed when Judge Merchan returned to the bench after a 15-minute absence, which he said was prompted by a few tardy prospective jurors.

The judge said that one prospective juror was experiencing flu-like symptoms and asked to be removed from consideration. The parties did not object.

As the prospective jurors filed in, Trump appeared to be motionless in his seat, staring straight ahead.

Questioning of the jurors has resumed, with one prospective juror — a finance professional — being excused after he said his “unconscious bias” might prevent him from being an impartial juror.

Apr 16, 10:12 AM

DA files formal request to hold Trump in contempt

The Manhattan district attorney’s office has filed its formal request to hold former President Trump in contempt over a series of recent social media posts that, among other things, call witnesses Michael Cohen and Stormy Daniels “sleaze bags.”

Prosecutors said yesterday that three of Trump’s social media posts this month “plainly violate” Judge Merchan’s limited gag order because they target known witnesses who will testify at the trial.

“And defendant’s violations were knowing and willful — indeed, they are the latest in what this Court has already recognized as a deliberate strategy to impede this criminal trial,” prosecutors wrote in Tuesday’s filing. “To be sure, defendant has loudly and repeatedly complained that the order is unlawful, in both court filings and other public statements. But no court has agreed with his objections, and a defendant’s mere disagreement with a court’s order is no defense to criminal contempt.”

Defense attorneys have insisted Trump was responding to “repeated, salacious, demon attacks” by Daniels and Cohen.

The judge has scheduled a hearing on the matter next Tuesday.

Apr 16, 10:00 AM

Trump seated at defense table as court gets underway

Former President Trump has reclaimed his seat at the defendant’s table, Judge Juan Merchan is back on the bench — and the second day of the criminal trial of the former president is underway.

Trump greeted court officers upon arrival, mouthing to one, “How are you?” as he made his way down the aisle accompanied by lawyers Todd Blanche, Susan Necheles and Emil Bove.

Trump is once again seated between Blanche and Bove.

The three men appeared to be in and out of conversation as they awaited the judge, with Trump periodically looking down at the desk or at the monitor in front of him.

Apr 16, 9:53 AM

Trump says Cohen payments were ‘legal expense’

Former President Trump, addressing reporters on his way into court, defended the way payments were made to his former attorney Michael Cohen, pushing back on the crux of the DA’s case that they were improperly labeled as legal expenses.

“I was paying a lawyer and I marked it down as a legal expense, some accountant,” Trump said. “I didn’t know. That’s exactly what it was.”

Manhattan District Attorney Alvin Bragg has accused Trump of improperly labeling the money as legal expenses to Cohen in order to hide that the funds were to repay hush money paid to Stormy Daniels to boost Trump’s electoral prospects.

“Legal expense — that’s what you’re supposed to call it,” Trump said.

“This is a trial that should never happen, it should have been thrown out,” he said.

Apr 16, 9:29 AM

Trump arrives at courthouse

Former President Trump has arrived at the courthouse for the second day of jury selection.

Unlike Monday when a small group of supporters and protesters greeted the former president, there were essentially none at the courthouse this morning.

He again railed on social media against the limited gag order that prevents him from targeting witnesses and others associated with the case.

“I want to speak, or at least be able to respond,” Trump wrote on his social media platform, attacking Judge Juan Merchan and again claiming the trial is “election interference.”

ABC News’ Soo Rin Kim and Lalee Ibssa contributed to this report.

Apr 16, 8:36 AM

Jury selection to continue on Day 2 of proceedings

Jury selection will continue today on Day 2 of former President Trump’s hush money trial.

Attorneys on Monday began the process of narrowing down the first group of 96 juror prospects, but none were seated by the end of the day.

Attorneys today will continue their questioning of the remaining juror prospects from that group, with a new group of prospective jurors scheduled to arrive in court this morning.

Apr 15, 5:25 PM

Trump, exiting court, criticizes scheduling conflicts

Exiting court after a lengthy day of proceedings, former President Trump complained about the scheduling conflicts created by his criminal trial, including conflicts with his presidential campaign, his plans to attend Supreme Court oral arguments, and potentially his son Barron’s high school graduation.

“Now I can’t go to my son’s graduation,” Trump said. “I can’t go to the United States Supreme Court. I’m not in Georgia or Florida or North Carolina campaigning like I should be,” Trump told reporters outside court.

Trump repeated his past complaints about the fairness of the trial, saying he has a “real problem” with Judge Merchan.

“It’s a scam, it’s a political witch hunt,” Trump said. “We’re not going to be given a fair trial.”

Click here to read the rest of the blog.

Read the full article here

Leave A Reply